Saturday, April 30, 2016

Between the Lines: Buckular Dystrophy

by Zinta Aistars

for WMUK 102.1 FM
Southwest Michigan's NPR affiliate




Between the Lines is my weekly radio show about books and writers with a Michigan connection. It airs every Tuesday at 7:50 a.m., 11:55 a.m., and 4:20 p.m. (or listen anytime online), on WMUK 102.1 FM, Southwest Michigan's NPR affiliate. I am the host of Between the Lines.

This week's guests: Joseph Heywood


Joe Heywood with his dog Shaksper (Photo by Lonnie Heywood)

Poaching. It’s a disease, an addiction. So says author Joseph Heywood. Killing deer, not for food or sport, but just for the thrill of the kill. One of the conservation officers with whom Heywood rides along every summer in Michigan's Upper Peninsula called that kind of killing “buckular dystrophy,” and Heywood’s ear perked up. It was the perfect title for his tenth Woods Cop mystery (Lyons Press, 2016).

Heywood lives in Portage, Michigan, and spends his winters as a "troll." That’s the term residents of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula use to describe Michiganders who live below the bridge — the Mackinaw Bridge. During the rest of the year, though, Heywood is in the U.P., writing and riding along with state conservation officers, gathering ideas for his mystery series. The Woods Cop series is based on the adventures and misadventures of Grady Service, a tough but fair-minded DNR conservation officer.

Heywood says he approaches his ride-alongs with the same sense of humor that often comes through in his writing.
“When we go in, I’m usually dressed in green,” Heywood says. “I don’t wear a uniform, I don’t have a gun or a badge, but I look basically like I belong. Sometimes when we get a tip from someone about illegal activity going on and we go into the place, I take out my teeth. All my teeth are knocked out — just like Grady Service’s — because I lost my teeth on a patrol. At any rate, my partner goes to the house and I get out of the truck and ...



Saturday, April 09, 2016

Between the Lines: Deadman and Mad Angler

by Zinta Aistars

for WMUK 102.1 FM
Southwest Michigan's NPR affiliate




Between the Lines is my weekly radio show about books and writers with a Michigan connection. It airs every Tuesday at 7:50 a.m., 11:55 a.m., and 4:20 p.m. (or listen anytime online), on WMUK 102.1 FM, Southwest Michigan's NPR affiliate. I am the host of Between the Lines.

This week's guests: Michael Delp

Michael Delp (Photo by Claudia Delp)

Now that he's retired, you'll most often find Michael Delp at his cabin on the Boardman River, near Traverse City, where he lives. Chances are he's chomping on a cheap cigar, a dog at his side, contemplating fish. Or poetry.

Delp was the long-time director of creative writing at the Interlochen Academy, a mentor and advisor with the Front Street Writers Program, and he's still on the editorial board for the Michigan Writers Series at Wayne State University Press. He is the author of numerous collections of poetry and prose. But when two personas took him over, he channeled them into a poetry collection called, Lying in the River's Dark Bed: The Confluence of the Deadman and the Mad Angler (Wayne State University Press, April 2016).

“The Deadman is old, very old in terms of my chronology,” says Delp. “I probably ran into him about 30 years ago. I was teaching somewhere, and a friend of mine came up to see me. We were talking poems one night. He handed me a poem and there was mention of Deadman in it. Just that word, nothing more. It struck me somehow. I went back to my room and was writing some notes, and I had this really odd feeling, something I’ve never felt before—I wasn’t in charge anymore.”
CREDIT WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY PRESS
Delp wrote a stream of poems about Deadman that night, and he kept writing more over the years. He says Deadman is the perfect paradox, the perfect contradiction, a kind of trickster.
“He can be killed, but he can’t die. He’s very bright; he’s not bright at all. You should trust him implicitly; you shouldn’t trust him at all. He can be anything he wants. It’s just fun to let him talk.”
The Mad Angler, the second persona that appears in Delp’s poems, was born from ...




Tuesday, March 22, 2016

Between the Lines: Writing with Dinty Moore

by Zinta Aistars

for WMUK 102.1 FM
Southwest Michigan's NPR affiliate




Between the Lines is my weekly radio show about books and writers with a Michigan connection. It airs every Tuesday at 7:50 a.m., 11:55 a.m., and 4:20 p.m. (or listen anytime online), on WMUK 102.1 FM, Southwest Michigan's NPR affiliate. I am the host of Between the Lines.

This week's guests: Dinty Moore

Dinty Moore (CREDIT RENITA ROMASCO)


Author Dinty Moore says he's gained a solid sense of humor because of his name. Moore is named for a character in a comic strip published in the 1920s called “Bringing Up Father.” The same name was later applied to canned beef stew. It inspired a childhood of teasing and ribbing, and an adulthood of constant questioning about the origins of his name. Moore says he's found humor to be an excellent distraction from all of that.

But Moore also knows how to be serious with serious focus, He's written nearly a dozen books used by new and aspiring writers who are learning the craft. Moore directs the Creative Writing Program at Ohio University.

Moore will visit Kalamazoo Valley Community College on March 23 and 24 as part of the college’s annual “About Writing” Visiting Writers Series. From 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. on both days, he'll read selections from his work. And from 2:15 p.m. to 3 p.m., Moore will talk about the process of writing. All events are free and open to the public.
Kalamazoo Valley's Visiting Writers series is coordinated by English instructor Rob Haight and offers students the opportunity to talk with professional writers and listen to readings of their work. Moore's The Mindful Writer was included in several KVCC writing classes during the last semester. Moore’s readings and talks will take place in the Student Commons Theater, Room 4240, on the Texas Township Campus, 6767 West O Avenue.
“Writing is an act of discovery,” Moore says. “You don’t sit down to ...."